On Moving, Moving On

A college kid helping kids and others

Q&A

 

Q:
Where did you get all this insight on life principles? I wouldn’t think that a 15 year old kid would know all this stuff?
Amanda, 14

A:
I’ve actually gotten similar questions like this before. And the answer is simple… my parents are the number one reason why I have grown up to live by these powerful life principles. They have taught me all about positive life practices and how to deal with certain situations since I was really young. I guess what they taught me just seemed to stick.
Nick

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Q:
Where do you think you would be right now in your life if you never moved?
Jeff

A:
I’ll tell you this, I probably wouldn’t have written this book about moving. But other than that, it’s a pretty hard question to answer. I have no idea how my life would have turned out if I never moved. I do know that I would have still made the most out of every situation that crossed my path. It doesn’t matter where you are in this world, because you can accomplish great things anywhere. Just have the proper positive mindset.
Nick

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Q:
What was the hardest part about writing your book?

A:
Definitely what I’m working on now… advertising the finished product. Making a lot of people aware of your book is not as easy as you may think. Many people have specialists who advertise their books for them. There’s quite a lot to learn about advertising correctly, and it can be very costly.

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Q:
What do you miss most about your old home?
Heather

A:
I’d say I miss just having a house of my own with just my own immediate family. I miss the privacy and the space that we had.  But still, I’m very thankful for the house that my family and I are living in now.
Nick

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Q:
Did you also draw the pictures in the book? You’re a really good drawer!
Chelsey, Age 9

A:
I didn’t draw the pictures in my book. I hired an illustrator to draw all the images at the beginning of each chapter. But thanks, I’ll pass on the kind words to the illustrator.
Nick

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Q:
 I moved 3 times already and always hated it. I’m glad I read your book because I’m about to move again. I learned some things I’m going to try this next time. Thank you.
Mike

A:
Wow, that’s incredible that you’ve moved three times! I’m really glad you can take some things from my book and make your next moving experience better. And thanks for picking up my book!
Nick

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Q:
In your book, the bus thing was kind of funny. Did that really happen?
Jack

A:
Oh yeah, it definitely did. Everything in my book actually happened. I wrote about all true events. The only exceptions are the names of the various people I talked about in the book. All of the names are fictitious, but the people themselves and what they did are pretty much true.
Nick

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Q:
What would you say was the best part of your moving experience?
Jen

A:
The best part of my moving experience was definitely going into my new school for the first time. I really enjoyed meeting a bunch of new people in my grade since nobody knew me. Everyone wanted to find out what kind of person I was. I found that this “getting to know each other” part was especially exciting.

Just be friendly and pleasant to people, and you should be able to make friends easily.  Remember, this is a great time to re-invent yourself, so if for example, you weren’t very friendly or nice before, now is  time to work on that and make the proper adjustments! 
Nick

 

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Q:
Do you still keep in touch with your friends from your old school?
Ben

A:
I definitely do! I’ll never forget the great times I had with my friends in my old school. We keep in touch by facebook, phone, and texting, and even once in a while manage to get together.   Just some very important words of advice: never lose sight of your true friends; always make time for them.
Nick

 

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Q:
What made you think you could get voted in as class president when you were the new kid in school?
Josh, 16

A:
I really didn’t even consider that question when I ran for president. It made no difference to me that I was a new kid. First of all, I really wanted to be of service to my class and help them out.  Secondly, I figured when running for class president I could make  a pretty good impression on the students in my class. I just thought that if I wanted people to know who I was, then the best way to accomplish that would be to stand up in front of the entire class and give a speech with confindence that meant something to them.  And it wasn’t just about popularity, it had to do with having a true desire to serve.
Nick

 

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Q:
Besides actually writing your book, how did you know what to do to get the physical book done? I’m talking about the cover, the printing and anything else needed to get done.
Jared, 15

A:
Good question! I knew that we had to make a cover, format the material in a particular way, and print lots of copies, but I didn’t know how that was going to be done. However, I didn’t allow that to stop me from getting started.  I realized that we would figure that out in the right order once I had the book written. 

It wasn’t so bad.  Here are the steps we took:  1) we researched the internet for information about the printing process, 2)  we worked with people we knew who were professionals in different areas of the process, 3)  we also worked with a referral.  A referral is a person you don’t know but is recommended by a trusted friend or colleague. 

As a side note, if you don’t happen to know of any professionals in the business, you can always find some talented people willing to help by searching the internet.
Nick

 

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Q: 
I have a babysitting job where I take care of 5 year old twin boys.  (I’m 13)  These boys are wild!  As soon as their parents leave, they run around the house screaming and yelling.  When they “settle down” to play, they end up making such a mess with toys and games spread all over the place.  I don’t want to tell their parents how awful they are.  Any suggestions?
Emma

 A: 
Well, I don’t really know anything about baby-sitting, but my sister does.  Sounds like she had similar issues at first, so she made up some sort of reward chart.  She set up a few rules for good behavior.   On her chart she has categories that reflect the areas they need work on — things like picking up their toys, using “inside” voices, being kind to each other . . . stuff like that.  She uses tally marks whenever they do something right.  If they reach a certain amount of tally marks, they get to pick a prize from her prize box before she leaves.  My sister said this works for her. 

Other than that, I would think that planning some activities that you can do with them would help.  Try bringing some games of your own that they would like, and have them play by your rules, meaning they have to listen and behave to have the privilege of trying something new.  Or you could bring a story book you can read to them that they have never seen before.  Just a few ideas . . . Good luck with the boys!
Nick

 

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Q: 
I’m just curious . . . how long did it take for you to write your book?
Matt

 A: 
It took me about 6 months or so to write the book.  That was just working at it a little at a time, and mostly just weekends.  After that, it took a few months to complete the editing process, and to get all the other pieces completed like the cover design, the interior artwork, the “legal” stuff like ISBN # & barcode, and of course the printing.  It might sound like a lot, but when you take it one step at a time, it’s not such a big deal.
Nick

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Q:

I have a problem.  It’s so close to Christmas & I have nothing to give my two older brothers.  They are 19 and 20 years old.  I am 12 and have nothing to give them.  They always give me really nice gifts.  I don’t want to give them something cheap or stupid.  I just don’t know what to do.   
Jenna

A:
You don’t need to compare yourself to your brothers — that would be unfair.  Your brothers are a lot older than you and probably have jobs which allow them to get you a nice gift.  Besides, don’t take this as an insult, but little girls are easy to buy for (I know I have a little sister not much younger than you).  Buying a gift for a 19 or 20 year old — not such an easy job. 

Here’s something you should remember.  Your brothers most likely don’t really care about getting a gift from you; but I bet they do care alot about YOU.  You should think about giving them something from the heart.  Try writing a poem, or maybe a short story about something special that  happened when you were little kids.  You can even frame your work to make it more special.  Maybe you’d like to draw or paint a picture for them.  How about making an easy but useful craft item like decorating a pencil container they can put on their desk.  Just “google” easy crafts & see what you come up with.  What about making a batch of their favorite cookies?  Start thinking of things that they like or could use and I bet you’ll come up with a couple of great gifts your brothers will appreciate.
Nick 

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Q:
In school we line up to go to the cafeteria for lunch.  Every day this girl in my class runs up to me and tries to cut in front of me.  She whispers in my ear that if I don’t let her get in front she won’t be my friend anymore.  I find this really annoying and she doesn’t stop.  What’s the best thing to do?
Miranda, Grade 1

A:
I’m just going to tell you how I would respond.  When she says “if you don’t let me get in front of you, I won’t be your friend anymore”, I’d say . . . “Oh really, well you’re not being my friend right now so get in line where you belong.”  She won’t like this but what’s the alternative?  Do you want to get bossed around and threatened?  A person who does that is not a friend anyway.  Sometimes all it takes is standing your ground even once, and that person will likely not try doing that sort of thing to you again.
Nick

 

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Q: 
Whenever my dad comes home from work he’s in a bad mood.  He yells at my sister and me and finds fault in all sorts of things.  This makes us not want to be around him, but he’s hard to avoid.  What should we do?
Shannon

A: 
Try greeting him with a smiling face and a happy disposition.  Moods can be “contagious” you know.  Don’t ask him how his day went because that will just remind him why he’s in such a lousy mood.  Younger kids can approach Dad with a hug and a drawing or picture they carefully colored.  Older kids may want to occasionally give Dad a batch of fresh baked brownies, (or something you made that he likes).  You and your sister should especially make sure you’re on your best behavior when he gets home so that you don’t give him something else to be mad about which then would get him yelling at you.  The nicer you are, the better the chance that you can help him to turn his mood around.  And if nothing else works, just try to stay out of his way until he settles down.
Nick

 

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Q:
I think some kids in my class are talking about me behind my back. I don’t want to tell the teacher because I don’t want people in my class to find out I did that. What should I do?
Meagan, Grade 9

A:
That one can be tough.  Sometimes we can imagine that people are talking about us when that is not the case at all.  Other times it is true.  I’d quietly pay attention for a while to see if I can get a more definite idea if it affects me.  In fact, it might just blow over in a short while; if not, then you must be very interesting to have others take the time to talk about you.  If no one is harming you, then you might want to let it go and just work on being your best. 

If there’s actually a problem and your reputation could be at stake, then it’s time to take some sort of action.  Could you possibly try being friendly with these people?  If not, you could approach your teacher privately. If you don’t want the other kids to find out you said anything then let your teacher know and he/she can probably figure out a way to correct the problem without making it seem like you told on them. School can be challenging but don’t let this prevent you from having a good time at school.
Nick

 

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Q:
I’m in 7th grade and will be moving to a different school in a few months where I don’t know anyone.  I’m not athletic, but I’m thinking of trying out for a team sport when I get there.  Do you think I should do that to try & fit in, or should I just forget about it so I don’t look like an idiot?
Sean

 A:
That’s a good question, but I think the real question is what do you want?  Are you interested in a particular sport or would like to get better in one?  If so, then give it a try with the right attitude – in the spirit of fun.  You might find that you like it & are good at it.  If you find you’re not so good, you might decide to try harder, or move on to something else.  Whatever you decide, do it for your own personal satisfaction, not just because you think it’s the right thing to do just because “everyone else” is doing it.

Here’s something else to think about:  it might be that you’re “not good” at sports because either you yourself, or someone else told you that, and probably when you were just starting out.  Sometimes all it takes is more effort and a desire to be great, and you might find that you’re an awesome athlete. 
Nick

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Q: 
 I’m 14 & I’ll be moving soon, and I have to admit, I’m nervous about it.  It seems like you got into a lot of things right away when you moved into your new school.  What gave you the courage to do all that stuff?
Ryan

A:
I would say it’s all about attitude.  I approached my new school in a relaxed way.  I looked for things I was interested in getting involved with, and just decided to go for anything that seemed interesting to me.  Just be relaxed, be confident, and go after what you want.  Know that you are capable, and that will give you the courage.  Look at it this way, if someone else can . . . then so can you!
Nick

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Q:
When I heard of your book, I aquired my own copy and think it is wonderful.(: I am also rather into writing and would maybe like to become published in the future. Any tips on how to do it? I’m fifteen as well.

~~Sharrie

A:
 Thanks for your kind words Sharrie.  If you like writing, then I say go for it.  Pick a topic that you have a good amount of knowledge in or research a topic if you need more information.  If you’re into story writing, then all you need is your own imagination.  Here’s what I did:  I was clear on my topic, so I decided what my chapter topics would be first.  Then a made an outline so I’d know what I would include in each chapter & then expand on it from there.  This step was extremely helpful & kept me on track.  Beyond that, I’d just write one chapter at a time so it wouldn’t be overwhelming.  Breaking up the project into small pieces made it pretty easy.  As far as publishing your work, there are different ways to do that and you can get all sorts of information on line about the publishing process, and then pick what works for you.  Hope that helps!

Nick

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Q:
I’m in 4th grade & have a small group of girls I hang out with at recess and sometimes in class. Another girl in our class is always following us trying to get in our group & we find this very annoying. We would be fine including someone else as a friend but this girl is not nice. She tries to make trouble between my friend group by saying things that aren’t true about us to one girl at a time. She tells the teacher mean things about us that aren’t true to get us in trouble and she thinks the teacher will force us to let her into our group. One time we even got sent to the principal’s office because of her lies. You know what else is annoying? She acts oh so sweet in front of teachers and parents & it’s all an act. She reminds me of that blond girl in the Movie “Mean Girls”. What can we do about this?

A:
It’s obvious that this girl doesn’t know how to be a friend. This is a skill that some people have naturally, but others have to learn. I suggest talking to your teacher and parents about it. Ultimately, what you probably should do is talk to this girl about the problem. Be honest. Let her know how she makes you feel and why. Then suggest to her what she should do to be a good friend. Of course you would do all this with a good attitude and try not to make her feel bad. Just state the facts w/o emotion and demonstrate what it takes to be a good friend. The girls in your friend group should first talk about how and when to approach her so you all agree, and can deal with this while having each other’s support.
Nick

4 Comments »

  1. Dear Nicholas cordts,
    I was wondering when your next book sighning is going to be. Also I was wondering if maybe you could make it close to uxbridge, ma so that it won’t be too far. Thanks!

    Yolanda! 😉 ❤

    Comment by Yolanda fernandez | March 3, 2011 | Reply

  2. I’ve recently lost a family member and I don’t know how to deal with it. The entire loss is depressing and I don’t wanna believe that she’s gone,even though I’ve been to her funeral and all that. I can’t talk to my parents about this because all they really say is to just suck it up. I’ve never lost someone before,and she was so young still. Just the thought of her being gone puts me in a mad mood and I don’t know who else there is to talk to. I just miss her more than anything an regret that I didn’t spend more time with her. It’s been I guess almost a month since I lost her but every time I see a picture of her it just depresses me. Any suggestions on how to deal with a loss? Thank you!

    Comment by Unmarked | February 10, 2013 | Reply

    • I’m very sorry to hear about your loss. I can totally relate to how you feel, because I lost my mother just over a year ago. I’ve discovered that the best way for me to deal with the loss is to write about my feelings in a journal. That way, you can write about whatever’s on your mind, and no one else will know. Every time I write in my journal, I feel a certain satisfaction. It’s hard to explain, but it’s like my mind is at peace after I’m done spilling out all my thoughts and feelings on the paper. If you don’t like to write, I suggest taking a more social approach to your stress. Find one person, it doesn’t matter how old they are. As long as you feel that they can listen and give their positive perspective, I highly suggest this method. Just know that this loss has made you stronger, and you can never give up, no matter how cruel life can appear. I hope that one of these approaches has a positive effect for you. Feel free to write back anytime.

      Comment by ncdownhill5 | February 12, 2013 | Reply

  3. Amazing! Its truly awesome post, I have got much clear
    idea concerning from this article.

    Comment by Mimi J. Lacson | September 25, 2014 | Reply


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